The House of Representatives has all the science we need

Climate change has been a popular topic in the news lately, what with the dire reports released by the United Nations and the National Climate Assessment stating that the effects of global warming are upon us and are irreversible.

This has concerned the military, as the Department of Defense has stated it “expects climate change to challenge its ability to fulfill its mission in the future.”

Thankfully, the House of Representatives has the Science Committee to do the military’s thinking for them on this issue. And they’re requesting the Department of Defense not spend any time worrying about climate change.

I’m sorry. I misspoke. They’re trying to make it law that the Department of Defense spend no resources studying climate change or any of its effects.

Last week, the House Science Committee voted to approve a spending bill amendment introduced by representative David McKinley, a Republican for West Virginia. This amendment “would prohibit defense spending on climate change research and the social cost of carbon analysis.”

In other words, the Pentagon would be prohibited from doing any research on any climate change science, although McKinley chooses to call it an “ideology” rather than science.

And thank goodness too! Can you imagine a military response to crazy weather caused by climate change?

This will not stop tornadoes! ... Probably.

This will not stop tornadoes! … Probably.

What does the military have to know about a potential world altered somehow by a different climate? The polar ice caps are melting, so we’ll need more navy and less army. There! Done!

Sure, the reports find that the weather might get more extreme, starting soon. There may be more tornadoes, more hurricanes, more wildfires, and a lot more flooding. But what’s the military going to do about that? Save people? The military is about killing and/or liberating people!

And if there are any serious disasters, we have the National Guard, which is completely different.

And if there are any serious disasters, we have the National Guard, which is completely different.

The bill, with the backing of the House Science Committee, passed the House and will go on to the Senate.

This is not the first time the House Science Committee has fought the good fight against groups who have no business in climate change research. Earlier this year, they demanded the Environmental Protection Agency publicly release all of the science and research that led them to any policy recommendation before making any recommendations.

The so-called “Secret Science Reform Act” was in large part a response to the EPA’s proposals to deal with climate change. Those recommended regulations would put burdens on industry to clean up their act in an attempt to reduce pollution and mitigate climate change.

But the head of the House Science Committee accused the EPA of using “secret science” to place undue burdens on the American economy when he authored the bill. The reasons the EPA would do this were also apparently a secret.

With any luck, the House Science Committee interfering with the military and with secret science will somehow prevent Secret Wars II from ever having happened.

With any luck, the House Science Committee interfering with the military and with secret science will somehow prevent Secret Wars II from ever having happened.

Opponents of the Secret Science Reform Act say the unclear wording places an undue burden on the EPA that makes their job nearly impossible, and that representative David Schweikert–the head of the House Science Committee who authored the bill–is a long-time climate change denier who is just lashing out at the multitudes who oppose him using “science” and “facts.”

But the real fact remains: this is the House Science Committee. Their expertise is right there in the name. So they know what they are doing when they tell the military to just ignore a scientific matter. And they are well within their means to tell the EPA that their reliance on science isn’t good enough.

They also know all the right questions to ask, since science is all about learning. For instance, recently a senior astronomer at the SETI Institute (Search for Extra Terrestrial Intelligence Institute) was on hand for a hearing on “Astrobiology and the Search for Life in the Universe.” Dr. Seth Shostak had to answer to the grueling round of questioning that would determine funding for his organization and perhaps the future of the search for intelligent life beyond our own planet for decades to come.

Representative Chris Collins stepped right to the fore and asked the most important question of all: “Have you watched Ancient Aliens and what is your comment on the series?”

The show that brought us this meme.

The show that brought us this meme.

That, folks, is the highest authority on science in this country. Something we can all be proud of.

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